Kayaking among playful otters in Resurrection Bay out of Seward Alaska.

Kenai Fjords National Park

Where massive glacier carve rugged landscapes and wildlife thrives.

Whale breaches near a passing day cruise ship in the Kenai Fjords National Park.

Kenai Fjords National Park

Where massive glacier carve rugged landscapes and wildlife thrives.

Take a riverwalk directly from the Seward Windsong Lodge.

Kenai Fjords National Park

Where massive glacier carve rugged landscapes and wildlife thrives.

Kenai Fjords 360 in front of Holgate Glacier.

Kenai Fjords National Park

Where massive glacier carve rugged landscapes and wildlife thrives.

Northwestern Glacier calving in the Kenai Fjords National Park.

Kenai Fjords National Park

Where massive glacier carve rugged landscapes and wildlife thrives.

Kenai Fjords National Park

Ancient earthen forces built the landscape of Kenai Fjords National Park. Tectonic plates smashed together. Magma vented up through cold ocean water. But it was the glaciers that carved out its famous fjords, leaving a coastline that looks raked by a giant's fingers.

Deep within those scoured inlets, the remains of that powerful ice exist in the form of tidewater glaciers. In fact, half the park is covered in ice. As glaciers churn against rocks, they leave a fine dust called glacial flour that flows into bay waters. Those minerals contribute to a healthy ecosystem for phytoplankton, and plankton support an array of larger animals. This is the park's other distinguishing feature: A thriving marine ecosystem with abundant wildlife like humpback and orca whales, sea otters, sea lions, harbor seals, porpoises, puffins, and kittiwakes.

Kenai Fjords National Park is most popularly accessed by day cruises from nearby Seward. These trips last anywhere from six to 10 hours. They visit either Aialik Bay or the Northwestern Fjord, both of which have massive tidewater glaciers and classic coastal Alaska scenery. Some day tours also offer kayaking as a way to explore the landscape even more closely. Park information is available at the main park visitor center in Seward's Small Boat Harbor and at the nature center at Exit Glacier.

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Because Kenai Fjords encompasses vast stretches of land as well as water, a visit isn't complete without walking a few of the park's designated trails. These paths are accessible from the Exit Glacier Nature Center on the north side of the park. A network of easy to moderate trails wander through the young forest and provide views of the glacier from the valley floor and a higher rocky overlook. The more strenuous Harding Icefield trail climbs four miles one way through wildflower meadows and occasional snowfields till it crests on a ridge with sensational icefield views. Local guide services also offer guided hikes and ice climbing treks in the park.

With so much to see, it is wise to plan for at least one overnight in neighboring Seward. Daily Kenai Fjords cruises depart from the dock directly in front of the Harbor 360, making this modern property particularly convenient. The Seward Windsong Lodge, which is located outside Seward on the way to Exit Glacier, provides free scheduled shuttle to the harbor.

Seward is about 130 miles south of Anchorage. Visitors arrive by the Alaska Railroad, Park Connection Motorcoach, rental car, or cruise. Alaska Tour & Travel can coordinate transportation and lodging for your Kenai Fjords National Park visit. For more ideas about what else to do in the area, check out our Seward activities page.

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Kenai Fjords National Park